Back Road Bound’s Favorite Songs in 2015 (Pt. 02)

The Second part of my annual music roundup.

Listen here:

 

Jack White : Did You Hear John Hurt? (from Another Day, Another Time)

The Avett Brothers : That’s How I Got To Memphis (from Another Day, Another Time)

 

Another Day Another Time Cover Jpeg

Danny Schmidt : Cries Of Shadows (from Owls)

Danny Schmidt Owls Cover JpegEliza Gilkyson : Peace Call (from Land Of Milk & Honey)

Eliza Gilkyson Land Of Milk And Honey Cover Jpeg

Bruce Cockburn : Pacing The Cage (from Slice O Life)

Bruce Cockburn Slice O Life Cover Jpeg

The Honey Dewdrops : Loneliest Songs (from Tangled Country)

The Honey Dewdrops Tangled Country album cover jpegEric Bibb : Sittin’ In A Hotel Room (from Deeper In The Well)

Eric Bibb Deeper in The Well Cover Jpeg

Joan Shelley : No More Shelter (from Over And Even)

Joan Shelley Over And Even Cover Jpeg

Son Volt : True To Life (Live At The Bottom Line 2/12/96) (from Trace)

Son Volt Trace Cover JpegDonovan : Epistle To Derroll (from A Gift From A Flower To A Garden)

Donovan A Gift From A Flower Cover JpegDar Williams : If I Wrote You (from Many Great Companions)

Dar Williams Many Great Companions Cover JpegBill Morrissey & Greg Brown : Fishing With Bill (from Friend Of Mine)

Bill Morrissey And Greg Brown Friend Of Mine cover Jpeg

The Cowboy Junkies : Misguided Angel (from The Trinity Sessions)

Cowboy Junkies Trinity Sessions Cover Jpeg

 

Dave Carter & Tracy Grammer : Way Over Yonder in The Minor Key (from Little Blue Egg)

Dave Carter & Trace Grammer Little Blue Egg Cover Jpeg

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Joan Shelley : Electric Ursa

Joan Shelley Electric Ursa cover jpeg

Out of the batch of new CD’s I bought recently, none has enchanted my quite as much as Joan Shelley’s 2014 album Electric Ursa. Being previously unbeknownst to me, a favourable review of her new album Over And Even attracted my attention to her, a quick listen of Electric Ursa on iTunes quickly made me realise I might be in for something very good. Which Electric Ursa indeed did turn out to be.

Joan Shelley hails from Louisville, KY. I am as yet not too informed on her musical background, but some tracks, especially the utterly fabulous album opener Something Small make me suspect she’s rather from an Independent Rock/Post-Rock background than from a straight Folk or Country one as wouldn’t be totally surprising given where she’s from. Although Folk clearly is the style most prominent in her work, even more so on her new album than on here. Something Small also is the highlight for me on Electric Ursa, it’s full of tension, and the hypnotic, mantra-like chorus of ‘It’s all layed out in front for you to take it’ is just magic. It’s the melodic phrasing and some of the guitar work on many tracks making her work stand out from many of her Folk contemporaries. I don’t even know if she herself would put herself in that musical corner, but the review mentioned above made me believe that.

River Low is turning up the tempo a little bit on here and is a VERY lovely and straightforward piece of acoustic Folk magic – just as I like it.

Moss and Marrow and First Of August both slow things down considerably and are dominated by the hushed sounds of gently strummed acoustic guitars, only sparsely augmented by instruments such as keyboards (Moss And Marrow) and lead guitar (First of August). They also, like many of her songs (on Over And Even as well), remind me a bit of a not-quite-so-dark Low, coupled with some prime Cowboy Junkies. Another comparison coming to mind (mine at least, I’m probably one of only few people still remembering them) mid-90’s alt country band Tarnation, mainly due to the reverb-drenched lead guitar on First Of August.

The short Remedios is a gorgeous instrumental (featuring her choir voice, but no words) and starting off with a lone and lonesome banjo to be accompanied by violin and dreamy keyboard sounds later in the song, giving it a hymnal, pastoral lullaby feeling. Dreamy being the appropriate word anyway to describe her music, all of her songs I so far know (on here and on her new album) possess that late night, sleepy atmosphere I am very much drawn to.

A short album (only about 33 minutes) but one sure to linger in my mind for a very long time.