The Honey Dewdrops : Tangled Country

The Honey Dewdrops Tangled Country album cover jpeg

Tangled Country is the 4th album by Baltimore’s The Honey Dewdrops. Not a trace to be found of the Wire’s gritty, ugly urbanism on it, thankfully.

The Honey Dewdrops are on the way to carving themselves a niche of exceedingly fine purveyors of the lonesome, gentle side of Alternative Country. Young was the first track of theirs I ever heard, and it quickly became clear to me, that their music was exactly my cup of tea. It’s a poignant summarization of the feeling many of us can relate to (certainly I can) of not being that young anymore and finding yourself slightly bewildered by the changes taking place to anybody else’s lifestyle, except you. The only thing preventing it from becoming a classic for me are its rather modern lyrics with their allusions to flat screen TV’s, Bluetooth and Facebook.

There’s a number of outstanding songs on here, such as the aforementioned Young. But this excellent song gets topped by Loneliest Songs – which is simply stunningly beautiful and lovely. One of the best songs I have heard in a long while. Plus, it’s pretty much the only song I can think of on which the bass is the instrument I like best, it’s plucking away wonderfully and forlornly in the background. Their masterpiece of a song so far, I’d say (not having heard any of their other records). Also excellent is the gorgeous Numb, the song most veering towards conventional country music sounds, I love the harmonica on here a whole lot.

The instrumental album closer Remington is quite amazing too, although it’s making do without Laurie Wortman’s enchanting vocals which are contributing substantially to making most songs on Tangled Country especially wonderful.

I am most probably not the only that has to think about Gillian Welch & David Rawlings listening to their music. And the fact that they do not quite reach that other, slightly more famous couple’s mile high class, can only be attributed to Welch and Rawlings being so far above and beyond anybody else in the field of this kind of music, at least in my book. BUT, on this very fine album, they definitely do come rather close to that on a number of songs. An album to cherish for a long, long time.

A fine live version of Loneliest Songs (without that fabulous bass of the album version, unfortunately).

 

Robert Earl Keen : Ride

It’s laughable I know, but this is the first time I consciously listen to a Robert Earl Keen song and I haven’t even got one of his albums (yeah, I know).

Don’t care much for the video to this, but there wasn’t a really good sounding version I could find of this on YouTube so I choose this one. It’s a smashing song. And perfect for a day you are fed up with your job…

Wussy – Crooked

It’s been a long while since I posted something, but this blog is still alive. Haven’t had the time to write a review, so it’s just another video.

Wussy are the successor-band of The Ass Pony’s Chuck Cleaver: I admired that band, or actually still do, for their exceedingly fine albums Grim, Some Stupid With A Flare Gun, Lohio and Electric Rock Music from waaaay back in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. I can hardly believe it’s been that long, I recently listened to Grim and was still blown away by the sheer class of it. Now that’s an idea for a review.

Anyway, this is a video I found on YouTube and it’s very fine too.